Constructing the Sew Over it Libby collar

This blog post contains gifted fabric. I chose the fabric to be able to blog about a garment and topic of my choosing;

One of my favourite recent makes is the Sew Over It Libby blouse. I’m entering the sewing stage that follows the immediate intense obsession of initially discovering sewing; now I’m realising I do actually need some versatile good quality separates in my wardrobe and first up was a classic blouse, for which the Libby seemed the ideal choice with a back yoke and standing collar. The pattern is intended for a viscose or georgette weight fabric.

I wanted a twist on the classic white silk shirt so chose this gorgeous silky Dune Off White viscose crepe from Atelier Brunette, which was kindly gifted by Dragonfly Fabrics for this project. Dragonfly are genuinely one of my favourite online fabric suppliers; Dorte and Simon run Dragonfly as a family business down in Brighton and their service, from ordering to fast delivery is second to none!

The Libby shirt is really popular and I’ve noticed a lot of people are making it right now but having trouble with the collar; something I also experienced.

After a lot of fiddling I got there and was really happy with my collar, mostly because I took the time to do a toile first. A toile, or muslin, is essentially a practice go of a garment to avoid ruining any beautiful fabric and with this viscose I wasn’t taking any chances. Toiling the garment first also meant I was sewing much faster and more confidently the second time, and enjoying it!

So here are my tips for sewing the Libby collar. I refer here to the numerical steps as listed in the Libby instructions and how my collar looked at each of those stages. The official instructions use a pale fabric which can be a bit tricky to follow so I made a ‘mini’ collar for this walkthrough!

Note: I didn’t interface the facing pieces to make it a bit easier to see what we’re doing. Also, I am lazy.

What you’ll need

L-R ice cream spoon, unpicker, pins, corner stabby thing, chalk pen, erasable marker

Key to the success of the Libby collar is accurately transferring the pattern markings to your pattern pieces. My secret weapon for this is….an ice cream spatula! Place the spatula on the paper lining up with the marking. Fold back the paper against the spatula then mark the fabric with a pen or chalk. I then take a needle and thread to add a hand stitch as a marker- there’s nothing worse than your chalk rubbing off or marker fading and you can easily remove these threads later.

Constructing the collar

We start at Step 14 in the instructions. You should have attached the collar stand to the collar and have the two pieces RST (right sides together)

Snip the corners and turn the collar so the right side is facing out. Machine tack along the slanted edge of the collar up to and not beyond the thread marker/mark. This tacking should be within the seam allowance so ideally about 0.5-1cm from the edge.

The machine tacking will go along the slanted edge but not further down than the thread marker

Now we’re up to Steps 16 – 19. Snip into the seam allowance at the markings closest to the shoulder seam on your shirt. TOP TIP: I found it really helpful to make a snip in the centre back neckline (fold your back piece in half using the shoulder seams to then snip in the exact centre).

Roll up and pin out the way the non-interfaced part of the collar. Align the interfaced piece RST together with the neckline. The centre notches will help you match up the pieces. The interfaced edges of the collar stand will align with the notches in the neckline. Pin and stitch with a 1.5cm seam allowance, using the mark (or in our thread marker) as your starting point, as shown below. Don’t catch the non interfaced collar piece!

I recommend snipping into the centre back neckline and matching up the notches
On the left here you can see how the interfaced edge aligns with the neckline notch and where the stitching begins

Phew, they’re attached and we’re at Step 20. At this point, unpin your non-interfaced fabric. Give the slanted, machine tacked edge of the collar a wiggle and align it with the front neckline. The notch in the neckline will help you to do this, and the far edge of the collar will align with the neckline notch further along.

Collar(pale green) will be moved upwards to align with neckline (darker green)
The collar edge will align up with the notch

Stitch. In the instructions it is assumed to stitch with a 1.5cm allowance but I would actually use a 1cm seam allowance. Later you’ll be attaching the facing over this stitching so you want this stitching line to be hidden.

Now we’re up to Step 21 of attaching the facings. This is actually super straightforward once you’ve done it but doesn’t really make sense during the process (if you’ve watched Dark on Netflix you know what I mean).

Here you overlock the outer edges of your facings and staystitch the neckline piece. Snip into the seam allowance (but not past the staystitching) at the points of your markings/thread markers.

I haven’t overlocked or interfaced my pieces but you can see the thread markers, stay stitching and snips here which will come in handy!

At Step 23, we attach the facings in a lovely collar-sandwich. With RST, align the edges of the facing and neckline together. Use your thread markers/markings to match the facing to the neckline, sandwiching the collar.

Shown here the notches in the facing and neckline will align. Sandwich the collar in between the neckline and facing.

The notches will align and give you room to wiggle slightly so that the pieces align, continuing to match the thread markers together.

Look how the thread markings on the collar, neckline and facing align – VERY satisfying
Facing is now sewn onto the shirt (the left hand side shown here). Top line of stitching is my staystitching, lower one is the main stitching with 1.5cm seam allowance.

Go slow here when stitching the facing on, and if you can, hand tack the pieces together first which will keep them flat while you stitch. The notch will help you to wiggle but just watch you don’t catch any of the facing in the stitching – pivoting slightly at the notch will help as well.

Trim the seam allowances (I layered the seams, trimming the top layer by 1cm and the second by 0.5cm) and turn the facings in. Press.

Now it’s time to finish off the collar stand nicely, at Step 26. Exactly at the facing edge, snip into the non-interfaced collar stand piece and the seam allowance of the interfaced piece and neckline.

Snip through the layers
Pin the pieces up inside the collar

Turn up the raw edges inside the collar and pin. I haven’t overlocked the edges of my facing here as it was just for a demo.

Here you can either handstitch or top stitch the collar. I have topstitched here and ironically it’s the neatest I’ve ever managed it, I wish it looked that this on my final shirt!

This would also be the point to add a label if you would like – my ‘made in self isewlation’ are great for sewing into seams as they have a 1cm seam allowance.

And your collar is done! At this point you can remove the thread markers and any staystitching at is visible, and finish the rest of your shirt.

I hope you found this tutorial useful! Have you got any tips for the Libby collar? Let me know in the comments or on instagram.

Thanks again to Dragonfly for providing the fabric for my finished garment – I love it! Dragonfly are one of the lovely indie businesses providing an exclusive discount code in this month’s newsletter – sign up for free to get monthly sewing updates and discount codes from our favourite indie crafty brands!

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